Hot Facebook message saves the world. Is then deleted for security reasons. Like/Unlike?

A panel discussion on global childhood malnourishment at Brookings including Doctors Without Borders (MSF)* and another two days later [at] an Ogilvy Exchanges hosted discussion of social media and effects on the work of USAID.* They both were held in Washington D.C. in the last quarter of 2010. The gist of my essay, however is more on social and political trending as they are effected by an explosion in numbers of wired global citizens who “vote” in overwhelming numbers on a daily carte des événements fraîches d’aujourd’hui rather than on traditional topics like hunger and medicine.

view of room before Malnutrition Conference

Brookings Institute Forum for Childhood Malnutrition discussion - photo Russ Imrie

Feats On The Ground

(updated March 27, April 5, and April 10, 2011)

This is a tale of two forums

Russell Imrie October 15, 2010 Washington D.C.

This is a tale of two forums: a panel discussion on global childhood malnourishment at Brookings including Doctors Without Borders (MSF)* and another two days later [at] an Ogilvy Exchanges hosted discussion of social media and effects on the work of USAID.* They both were held in Washington D.C. in the last quarter of 2010. The gist of this essay, however is more on social and political trending as they are effected by an explosion in numbers of wired global citizens who “vote” in overwhelming numbers on a daily carte des événements fraîches d’aujourd’hui than on hunger and medicine. It changes day to day, a chalkboard if you will. “Hi, I’m your laptop and today’s special–(in real time as I write this essay…where’s the love for official government policy and State Department positioning in a just-popped-up Facebook friend’s chat thoughts? It isn’t.)

-ust saw Restrepo…don’t understand the point of letting our men and women die in a foreign land…while they are killing innocent woman and children”

Political policies and charitable giving agendas have winners and losers in an arena of players with instant, real-time access to the kinds of opinion-building items and relationships that as recently as 15 years ago were almost exclusive domains of major broadcast and print media organizations. That, plus government press releases and political shills. These are in no way gone. But there is something radically newer afoot. In this rave new world of instant conversation and attention.app as opposed to attention classic is exerting global pressure on hidebound organizational behaviors, my Facebook friend’s enemy (the local [U.S. connected?] tyrant) is trending to be my enemy. From my cozy Virginia living room, the conflict is joined. Later, more coffee and I’ll read the Post to see what today’s party line is.

my reply: I say yes, the state says no, I say why, they say “do u need 2 know?” (apologies to the Beatles)

Two disparate organizations with two different global missions. One grass-roots funded and apolitical. The other, the face of a nation-state with the power and the baggage of politics. But it’s a real sack race thing. They totter into a fluid future as  siblings immutably hitched together in a state of web “presence”: “classic” organizations born generations ago challenged with adapting to instantly updated social landscapes of an increasingly wired world where classical “nationality” and “citizenship” are merely channels (or Facebook groups.) Twitter feeds and content amalgamators supersede controlled messages and signals that fifteen-year-old web technology once artfully published with first-generation Web Sites. Obsolescence comes sooner in the cycle. It’s much harder hitting, more dynamic, faster, now.

two girl's shoes tied together before odd looking silhouette ???

State of states - a duet in shadow - photo Russ Imrie

How do they win the hearts, minds and perhaps most importantly, the “friends” lists of the iNhabitants? Why is that “mouse click” important? Is this a harbinger of whence an entirely new model for human governance, replacing the present nation-state model developed over almost 2000 years of world history, is going?

Panel Brookings Institute 10_12_10

photo Russ Imrie


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