Common ground at last in the Middle East: my #enemy’s enemy is errr…really #scary!

What do the Communist Party of China (CPC), the Koch brothers (and their puppet Governor Walker of Wisconsin), Benjamin “Bibi” Netanyahu and Muammar Gadaffi have in common? They’re all scared spitless at the exploding [secular or fundamentalist] expression of bottom-up democracy evident in the Middle East and in the Wisconsin Capital. Mileage may vary but it’s all about the question of control by traditional power centers and the base assumptions they operate from. In Israel, it is reluctantly acknowledged that dealing with the PA is better than fundamentalists.

l. to r. Yousef Munayyer (moderator), Nadia Hajib, Dr. Michele Dunne, Ambassador Clovis Maksoud - photo Russ Imrie

Globalization favors chaos theory: a butterfly flaps its wings in the jungle and a hurricane is formed in the Caribbean; in Saudi Arabia, a baby is born with a silver spoon in its mouth, and two towers fall in Manhattan. An American politician acts like a Mexican cacique and war explodes on the other side of the planet. – Rafael Barajas aka “El Fisgón

Forum: The Palestine Center March 2011

Note: As I edited this, revolt was violently spreading through Tripoli and the whole nation of Libya. Off and on we were talking to a friend in a darkened flat in the city of Tripoli. He had witnessed some awful things like hijacked ambulances full of free-firing thugs. We have not heard from him in more than a week.

What do the Communist Party of China (CPC), the Koch brothers (and their puppet Governor Walker of Wisconsin), Benjamin “Bibi” Netanyahu and Muammar Gadaffi have in common? They’re all scared spitless at the exploding [secular or fundamentalist] expression of bottom-up democracy evident in the Middle East and in the Wisconsin Capital. Mileage may vary but it’s all about the question of control by traditional power centers and the base assumptions they operate from. In Israel, it is reluctantly acknowledged that dealing with the PA is better than fundamentalists.

My point, shared in article by Fareed Zakaria

It’s not a silver bullet, but clearly today’s information technology has the effect of disintermediating – it breaks down hierarchies and monopolies.

That’s got to be good for the individual, and it must be bad for dictatorships.

While most of that is correct, we must include global corporate behemoths as well, not just tin-pot dictators. Some have greater revenues than smaller nations and are not really hamstrung by any ethical or national loyalty. But are threatened by the individual’s elevation to global player and actor enabled by technology.

In Israel, a slip of the tongue is maybe the flap of the proverbial butterfly’s wings: “Bibi rewrites history and reality” Richard Silverstein in Eurasia Review . Netenyahu’s in love with hapless and discredited PA. The perfect negotiating foe as far as Israeli squatters’ interests are concerned.

Israelis are in the dubious position of wanting the present rulers of Syria to stay in power. They view the uprisings of late might open up that nation to a takeover by the Muslim Brotherhood: Israel, no fan of Assad, may prefer that he stay by Janine Zacharia (Washington Post, Wednesday March 30).

Scholars finesse, and try to decipher trends and courses of study or consulting opportunities while a friend in Tripoli skypes and watches boys grabbed by Gadaffi’s minions from neighborhood streets out in front on this Friday evening.

It’s obvious change for our friend holed up in a Tripoli flat is a good thing. What does he have to lose? Israel, like most governments appalled by wikileaks and restive, wired populaces has a great, great deal to lose.  The U.S. is concerned too as it struggles to preserve the hegemony of the nation-state while rhetorically advocating freedom of speech around the world – at least in countries the U.S. considers problems. But I venture the localized uprisings in Egypt, Tunisia , and Libya are harbingers to the more fundamental realignments of power the information age and technology are bringing to the organizational culture of humanity. There’s more happening here than simple hate of Mubaruk or Gadaffi. What will governments look like in 50 years?  Might a formal global government emerge with the networked framework global corporations have today? Tremors are upsetting the status quo and. Fracturing dead ahead.

Worldwide, governments and entrenched groups see “fundamentalist violence, idealogical conflicts between people loyal to rival nations, and crime as the sources of mushrooming numbers of conflicts. They are wrong. They cannot see the forest for the trees. Global citizenship, formalized or not, is the future and in the context of expecting it, some perspective will develop for us as we live through its birth.

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