Wickedleaks part 2: the self-inflicted deluge of leaks and cookies tracking you

“…Not only is the system broken, but it was never supposed to be particularly secure in the first place.  Ed didn’t design the network to defend against theses things,” said Vint Cerf, who was co-author of one of the core internet protocols before chairing ICANN. “My thought at the time, thirty five years ago, was not to build an ultra-secure system, because I couldn’t even tell if the basic system would work.” Cerf, who has a generally upbeat tone about most things,give the impression that he remains pleasantly surprised that the Internet has continued to function and thrive—even though, as he put it, “We never got to do the production engineering, the version ready for prime time.”


Wickedleaks part 2: the self-inflicted deluge
Russ Imrie February 21, 2012

The  faustian.app full version upgrade to secure Internet security. Not. (at the National press Club, October 11, 2011)

“…Not only is the system broken, but it was never supposed to be particularly secure in the first place. Ed didn’t design the network to defend against theses things,” said Vint Cerf, who was co-author of one of the core internet protocols before chairing ICANN. “My thought at the time, thirty five years ago, was not to build an ultra-secure system, because I couldn’t even tell if the basic system would work.” Cerf, who has a generally upbeat tone about most things, gives the impression that he remains pleasantly surprised that the Internet has continued to function and thrive—even though, as he put it, “We never got to do the production engineering, the version ready for prime time.”[1]

So there’s a price we’re paying for the latest cool app or the convenience of making a doctor’s appointment from home and transferring more cash to checking from savings. A lesser cost is paid by marketers and sellers who are much better prepared to manage it. That price is a rethinking of the notion of privacy. Rights advocates and business lobbies are scrambling to get the government to show some spine and make business accountable for privacy violations while on the other hand, entrepreneurs schmooze and spend to make sure the FTC, FCC, Congress and others roll over and give up one of the family jewels of citizenship–an absolute right to privacy–one that is assumed by many to be safeguarded through oversight and appropriate regulations. By others, not so much.

There is an inconvenient problem though, and we are seeing it every day. The normally well-greased path of legislation has gotten a little bit off track. Thanks to  a headline-grabbing epidemic of fact.  It’s name is hacker, or cybercrime. And it’s not just someone getting your online library password or your gmail login. Premier security outfit RSA is the source of digital “keys” that authenticate critical online connections. With collateral damage still ricocheting from battlefield PCs to banking offices, RSA is trying to restore confidence in its products, once the standard for encryption and security best practice, after hackers “broke in” and stole code. Stratford, a major security resource  with clients including Bank of America, the Defense Department, Doctors Without Borders, Lockheed Martin, Los Alamos National Laboratory and the United Nations was cracked in an act of extreme humiliation. Donations in client’s names to charities were made from client credit card accounts. And within the last few  weeks, the CIA website was hobbled after Anonymous attacked and posted an online video all about it.

Public confidence is shaken by these spectacular break-ins. And for business that’s not good.

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