Tag Archives: Wired (magazine)

Moore, not less in the future as tech rends old fiefs (like My Nation-state) moot

 

Ben Hammersley speaking at Brookings - photo Russ Imrie

Ben Hammersleyspeaking at Brookings – photo Russ Imrie

I attended a Brookings Institution event recently featuring the renowned Ben Hammersley (Wired Magazine Editor-at-Large) to see what the future has in store.

“Adding Fuel to the Wi-Fire: What is the Nexus between Social Media, Emerging Technogies, and Digital Radicalization?”

Moore’s law is making things more difficult to control, at least for the status quoifate of assumptions.
Barclay’s Bank fiasco could not have been done by Iran—l ocal muck-up—but if so, it would have been war
Nation-state is changing, local government, activities empowered overt national parliament
“why aren’t we sending ambassadors to Walmart, Facebook?” – they have the ppl, the money, a “national”—no international identity
viruses and malware must be treated as great public health issues as smallpox and malaria
important group forming now empowered around myriad social issues state once addressed satisfactorily by the immutable social ecosystem of government, nation-states, religion, and philosophy, but in a quantum shift the “satisfactory” itself has mutated (and is now infinitely mutable) under the gamma radiation of natural-language trend searches, the Phased Twitter Ray and equatorial Ushahidi storms. New systems of cooperation, curation, and critique are being birthed that carry the DNA of global consciousness in anyone with an Internet connection, computer, or smartphone.
Why is this upsetting, or unacceptable, to millions? And now to that crux: the agnosticism toward the older social systems that connectivity and technology is activating. For it must be something inherent in humans and activated by, not created by, technology. So de facto is the global world.

distant US Capitol dome

U.S. Capitol SOTU eve, 2011 – photo Russ Imrie

Russell Imrie is a content producer, webmaster and an American Indian blogger living in the Washington DC area.
Copyright © forever and 2012 by Russell Imrie

 

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FISA domestic warrantless spying on Americans hiding behind stonewall section 702

Let me say, the material here actually rates a “WTF?” if anything does.

Russ Imrie July 2012

Update September 13 

Update June 2013

from Wired…
House Approves Sweeping, Warrantless Electronic Spy Powers
Welcome to more of the never-never land of domestic spying…and your so-called right to privacy. So your privacy, apparently incredibly revered by the NSA is so respected by them that they cannot disclose if they spied on you or not because THAT information would be a violation of that privacy, which they had just violated.

The National Security Agency told lawmakers that it would be a violation of Americans’ privacy to disclose how the measure is being used in practice. The NSA said the “NSA leadership agreed that an IG (Inspector General) review of the sort suggested would further violate the privacy of U.S. persons.”

Back to Regularly Scheduled Blog Post.

Senator Ron Wyden (D-OR) took an hour out if his busy day to tell us at the Cato Institute why he’s disturbed about the Foreign Intelligence and Surveillance Act of 2008 (FISA).

Ron Wyden of Oregon

Ron Wyden of Oregon (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

It’s up for renewal and maybe some much-needed polishing and refinements. Refinements like telling Ron, serving on the Senate Select (the big enchilada here) Committee on Intelligence that is tasked with supervising this stuff, why they can’t tell him why they can’t tell him more about Section 702 so he can do his (confidential, top secret, etc.) job.

Section 702 is at the crux of the matter. The loophole is semantic one that intentional or not, can be “spun” to authorize otherwise illegal and warrantless communications of U.S. Citizen sin-country.

Senators Wyden and Mark Udall have battled on the front against this stonewall for three years. It seems that even telling Wyden [and the committee] why they can’t be told more is somehow a violation of security. Joseph Heller would be pleased.

The recently disclosed and confirmed (week of July 15) mass violations of Americans‘ privacy by warrantless and illegal under the Act domestic electronic surveillance plus admitted violations of the spirit of the law as well deeply concern the Senator.

The law is crafted so that disclosures about why this keeps happening and who has been spied on can’t be done unless enquiries are specific, with names, times, and so on. The law also stipulates that none of that information can be released, not even to the Select Committee! So citizens can’t find out anything. This crazy system thus prevents any peeks behind the wall of the NSA, NO transparency in other words. Not even for highly qualified lawmakers charged with overseeing the law. That’s a problem.

l. to r. Sen. Ron Wyden ( D-OR), Michelle Richardson (ACLU), Julian Sanchez (Cato-moderator), Eric Lichtbau (NYT) - photo Russ Imrie

l. to r. Sen. Ron Wyden ( D-OR), Michelle Richardson (ACLU), Julian Sanchez (CATO-moderator), Eric Lichtbau (NYT) – photo Russ Imrie

“We CAN have both security and respect for our privacy ” Senator Ron Wyden

distant US Capitol dome

U.S. Capitol SOTU eve, 2011 – photo Russ Imrie

Russell Imrie is a  Networking and Content Specialist, webmaster and an American Indian blogger living in the Washington DC area.

Copyright © forever by Russell Imrie